Press Releases

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2024

Riesling wines: Human Odorant Receptor for Characteristic Petrol Note Identified for the First Time

Climate change does not stop at grapevines. Too much sun means that the bouquet of German Riesling wines becomes dominated by a petrol note (some) customers do not appreciate. A research team from the Leibniz Institute for Food Systems Biology at the Technical University of Munich has now identified the human odorant receptor responsible for the perception of this special aroma note for the first time.

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Leibniz Institute for Food Systems Biology at TU Munich is Involved in New Leibniz Labs

Freising, March 21, 2024 - At its meeting on March 19, 2024, the Senate of the Leibniz Association made far-reaching decisions in various cross-institute funding formats. In a new format, the Senate approved three Leibniz Labs for the first time. Each of these labs will be funded for three years with three million euros. The Leibniz Institute for Food Systems Biology at the Technical University of Munich is involved in two of the Leibniz Labs.

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Muscaris Grapes: Molecular Secret of Lychee Note Revealed

Freising, March 11, 2024 - A team of researchers from the Leibniz Institute for Food Systems Biology at the Technical University of Munich has succeeded for the first time in identifying the odorants responsible for the characteristic lychee note of Muscaris grapes. The new findings form the basis for further studies investigating the extent to which the aroma-relevant compounds are transferred from the grapes into wine. At the same time, they provide a scientific basis for the targeted breeding of innovative and resistant grape varieties with distinctly fruity aroma characteristics.

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Studies on Coffee Consumption−Biomarker Validated

Freising, March 04, 2024 - In order to record coffee consumption in nutrition and health studies, researchers usually rely on self-reporting by participants. However, this is not always reliable. It would therefore be desirable to conduct additional studies to objectively verify individual consumption using biomarkers. A research team led by the Leibniz Institute for Food Systems Biology at the Technical University of Munich has now validated the suitability of a specific roasted coffee compound and proposes it as a reliable and practical food biomarker.

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Kurzmeldung

Stellungnahme zum Ergebnis des ersten, vom Deutschen Bundestag eingesetzten, Bürgerrates „Ernährung im Wandel“ veröffentlicht

Freisinger Professorin ist Mitglied des wissenschaftlichen Beirates des Bürgerrates

Freising, 22. Februar 2024 - Der Bürgerrat des Deutschen Bundestages zum Thema „Ernährung im Wandel“ hat am Dienstag, 20. Februar 2024, seine Ergebnisse in Form eines Bürgergutachtens (20/10300) an Bundestagspräsidentin Bärbel Bas sowie Vertreterinnen und Vertretern der Fraktionen überreicht. Zehn Mitglieder des den Bürgerrat beratenden wissenschaftlichen Beirats haben zum Ergebnis des ersten, vom Deutschen Bundestag eingesetzten Bürgerrates „Ernährung im Wandel“ eine Stellungnahme veröffentlicht. Frau Prof. Dr. Veronika Somoza, Direktorin des Freisinger Leibniz-Instituts für Lebensmittel-Systembiologie an der Technischen Universität München, ist Mitglied des wissenschaftlichen Beirats, dem insgesamt elf Wissenschaftlerinnen und Wissenschaftler angehören.

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Mystery of Novel Clove-Like Off-Flavor in Orange Juice Solved

Freising, February 6, 2024 - A research team led by the Leibniz Institute for Food Systems Biology at the Technical University of Munich has solved the mystery of a novel clove-like off-flavor in orange juice, the cause of which was previously unknown. The study proves for the first time that the undesirable flavor note is due to the odorant 5-vinylguaiacol. As the results of the study show, the substance is mainly produced during the pasteurization process when residues of a cleaning agent react with a natural orange juice component under the influence of heat.

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2023

Spin-Off-Projekt: Analyse der Biodiversität von Glucosinolat-Verbindungen in Kohlgemüse

Kooperation des Leibniz-Instituts für Gemüse- und Zierpflanzenbau (IGZ) e.V. mit dem Leibniz-Institut für Lebensmittel-Systembiologie

Großbeeren/Freising, 01. Dezember 2023 - Gemeinsam mit dem Leibniz-Institut für Lebensmittel-Systembiologie an der Technischen Universität München (LSB) hat das IGZ Fördergelder für die computergestützte Analyse von Metaboliten-Profilen in Kohlgemüsearten eingeworben. Das Vorhaben ergänzt die Arbeiten des „SharpGreens“ Projekts, dass der Frage nachgeht, wie die menschliche Gesundheit mithilfe von Kohlgemüse verbessert werden kann. Dort werden Kohlsorten mit einem hohen Gehalt an gesundheitsfördernden Pflanzeninhaltsstoffen identifiziert, um daraus innovative Lebensmittel zu entwickeln.

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Ausgezeichnetes Familienbewusstsein: Zertifikat zum audit berufundfamilie erteilt bekommen

Freising, 18. Oktober 2023 – Das Leibniz-Institut für Lebensmittel-Systembiologie an der Technischen Universität München hat am 30. September 2023 erstmals für die strategische Gestaltung seiner familien- und lebensphasenbewussten Personalpolitik das Zertifikat zum audit berufundfamilie erhalten.

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News on Beer Aroma: More Than 20-Year-Old Assumption Disproved

Freising, September 28, 2023 – Hop-derived constituents not only increase shelf-life and bitterness of beer, but can also significantly influence aroma. An important hop odorant is linalool, which has a floral and citrus-like scent. Under the leadership of the Leibniz Institute for Food Systems Biology at the Technical University of Munich, a team of scientists has now disproved a roughly 20-year-old assumption about this odorant. The new study contributes to a better understanding of changes in beer bouquet during the brewing process and beer aging.

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Research Team Identifies Human Odorant Receptor for Horse Stable Odor

Freising, August 1st, 2023 - Para-cresol is an aromatic compound with a strong horse stable-like odor. It contributes to the off-flavor of some foods, but it is also detectable as a characteristic odorant in whiskey and tobacco, as well as in the urine of various mammals. A research team led by the Leibniz Institute for Food Systems Biology at the Technical University of Munich has now discovered which odorant receptor humans use to perceive para-cresol.

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New Role for Taste Receptors: Bitter Taste Receptors Could Serve as Endogenous Sensors for Bile Acids

Freising, July 3, 2023 - Taste receptors for bitter substances are not only found on the tongue but also on cells outside the oral cavity. As a new study by the Leibniz Institute for Food Systems Biology at the Technical University of Munich now shows, extraoral bitter taste receptors could also serve as endogenous sensors for bile acids. This discovery suggests that, in addition to food components, endogenous substances may have influenced the evolution of bitter taste receptors. Furthermore, the study provides new approaches to explore the health effects of food constituents in which extraoral bitter taste receptors are involved.

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It's the Combination that Matters: Oatmeal- Plus Maggi Seasoning-Odor Results in Walnut Aroma

Freising, June 14, 2023 - A research team from the Leibniz Institute for Food Systems Biology at the Technical University of Munich has analyzed the aroma of walnut kernels and deciphered the underlying "odorant code". As the team shows for the first time, the typical walnut aroma is created by the combination of two odorants that are present in the nuts in roughly a one-to-one ratio. The first substance is sotolon, which smells like Maggi Seasoning sauce and which, as a single component, characterizes the aroma of lovage, for example. The second compound is called (2E,4E,6Z)-nona-2,4,6-trienal. It is known from oat flakes and is responsible for the typical odor there.

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Human Immune Cells React to Non-Nutritive Sweeteners

Freising, May 16, 2023

Diet drinks often contain a mix of non-nutritive sweeteners that also enter the bloodstream after consumption. As a new pilot study shows, even dietary intake levels of saccharin, acesulfame-K and cyclamate are enough to modulate the copy rate of various genes in white blood cells. "Our data suggest that this modulation sensitizes immune cells to certain immune stimuli," says Dietmar Krautwurst of the Leibniz Institute for Food Systems Biology at the Technical University of Munich. He adds: “Likewise, they also suggest that taste receptors may act as sweetener sensors of the cellular immune system.”

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Prof. Veronika Somoza Elected Deputy Section Spokesperson of the Leibniz Association

Freising, March 29, 2023

On March 16, 2023, the directors of Section C Life Sciences with a focus on biodiversity and health of the Leibniz Association elected Prof. Veronika Somoza as their deputy spokesperson for two years. The distinguished scientist is thus also a deputy member of the Leibniz Association's Presidential Board.

Veronika Somoza has been director of the Leibniz Institute for Food Systems Biology at the Technical University of Munich since November 2019 and is the first woman to hold the office of deputy spokesperson for Section C. With 24 institutes, the latter is one of the largest of the five Leibniz Sections. 

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Pungent Ginger Compound Puts Immune Cells on Heightened Alert

Freising, February 14, 2023

Ginger has a reputation for stimulating the immune system. New results from the Leibniz Institute for Food Systems Biology at the Technical University of Munich (Leibniz-LSB@TUM) now support this thesis. In laboratory tests, small amounts of a pungent ginger constituent put white blood cells on heightened alert. The study also shows that this process involves a type of receptor that plays a role in the perception of painful heat stimuli and the sensation of spiciness in food.

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"Aromastoffe in unseren Lebensmitteln - mehr als nur Geruch und Geschmack" – TUM@Freising-Vortrag mit Prof. Veronika Somoza

Freising, 25. Januar 2023

Aromastoffe tragen wesentlich zum Genuss beim Essen bei. Doch sie verändern nicht nur den Geschmack – sie haben auch gesundheitliche Wirkungen, erklärt Frau Prof. Veronika Somoza am Donnerstag, 9. Februar 2023, um 19 Uhr im Lindenkeller in Freising. Frau Prof. Somoza ist Direktorin des Leibniz-Instituts für Lebensmittel-Systembiologie an der Technischen Universität München (LSB) und gleichzeitig Professorin für Nutritional Systems Biology der Technischen Universität München (TUM) in Freising. Bei ihrem Vortrag im Rahmen der Veranstaltungsreihe TUM@Freising spricht sie darüber, wie natürliche Aromastoffe unser Körpergewicht, die Nahrungsaufnahme und sogar unser Immunsystem beeinflussen.

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Chicory, surrogate and roasted coffee provide new insights into mechanisms of taste perception

Freising, January 23, 2023

The composition of foodstuffs, but also the sequence of dishes, are important for the perfect taste experience of a menu. This insight, based on experience, is well known. The molecular causes of the pleasure-enhancing effects, on the other hand, are still poorly understood. Using the example of chicory, surrogate and roasted coffee, a study by the Leibniz Institute for Food Systems Biology at the Technical University of Munich (LSB) now explains for the first time why the order in which we eat food can be decisive for bitter taste perception and what role bitter taste receptors play in this process.

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2022

New biomarkers for coffee consumption

Freising, December 07, 2022

In search of new biomarkers for nutrition and health studies, a research team from the Leibniz Institute for Food Systems Biology at the Technical University of Munich (LSB) has identified and structurally characterized three metabolites that could be considered as specific markers for individual coffee consumption. These are degradation products of a group of substances that are formed in large quantities during coffee roasting but are otherwise rarely found in other foods. This and the fact that the potential biomarkers can be detected in very small amounts of urine make them interesting for future human studies.

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Tracking down satiety mechanisms in the stomach   

Bitter protein fragments stimulate gastric acid secretion

Freising, October 11, 2022

Casein makes up the majority of the proteins in cheese and quark. Although casein itself does not taste bitter, its digestion in the stomach also produces bitter-tasting protein fragments (peptides). This has been proven for the first time in a study led by the Leibniz Institute for Food Systems Biology at the Technical University of Munich (LSB). The study also suggests that the bitter peptides are able to stimulate acid secretion from gastric cells via their cellular bitter receptors. A mechanism that, according to the research team, could contribute to the long-known satiating effect of milk protein.

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Combating malnutrition–Egg powder suitable as a food supplement?

Freising, September 15, 2022

Malnutrition is a key challenge not only in African countries. As an international study led by Veronika Somoza now shows, egg powder is a food with great potential to improve the nutritional situation of children in deprived areas. Compared to pasteurized whole egg, the powder contains lower amounts of essential fatty acids, but still provides many vitamins, indispensable amino acids and important trace elements. In addition, it has a long shelf life without additional preservatives, is easy to transport over long distances and is simple to prepare.

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Hoher Besuch am “Food Science Day” des Freisinger Leibniz-Instituts

Freising, 05. August 2022

Am 04. August 2022 freute sich das Leibniz-Institut für Lebensmittel-Systembiologie an der Technischen Universität München (LSB) anlässlich seines „Food Science Day“ hochrangige Gäste aus Wissenschaft und Politik begrüßen zu dürfen.

Zu ihnen zählten die neue Präsidentin der Leibniz-Gemeinschaft, Prof. Dr. Martina Brockmeier, der Stiftungsratsvorsitzende MDirig Dr. Manfred Wolter vom Bayerischen Staatsministerium für Wirtschaft, Landesentwicklung und Energie sowie die Freisinger Bürgermeisterin Birgit Mooser-Niefanger. Der Vorsitzende des Wissenschaftlichen Beirats, Dr. Gerhard Krammer, Forschungsleiter bei der Symrise AG, sowie seine Stellvertreterin Prof. Dr. Elke Richling von der Technischen Universität Kaiserslautern sendeten zudem eine gemeinsame Grußbotschaft per Video. In dieser dankten sie dem LSB-Team für dessen ausgezeichnete Arbeit.

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Odorant Analysis 2.0 – Technique for the Isolation of Volatile Food Compounds Optimized

Freising, July 29, 2022

A research team from the Leibniz Institute for Food Systems Biology at the Technical University of Munich (LSB) has succeeded in automating an established method for the gentle, artifact-avoiding isolation of volatile food ingredients. As the team's current comparative study now shows, automated solvent-assisted flavor evaporation (aSAFE) offers significant advantages over the manual process. It achieves higher yields on average and reduces the risk of contamination by nonvolatile substances.

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Progress in bioanalytics: Production of RNA chips significantly simplified

RNA chips can contribute to the exploration of new methods to diagnose and treat diseases such as cancer

Vienna/Freising, July 26, 2022
Biochips (microarrays) are modern analytical tools that allow thousands of individual detections to be performed simultaneously in a small amount of sample material. A team led by Mark Somoza from the Faculty of Chemistry at the University of Vienna has now presented a new method in "Nature Communications". With this method, commercially available DNA chips can be quickly and easily converted into RNA chips, which are otherwise much more difficult to produce. Such RNA microarrays help to elucidate the still unknown functions of RNA molecules in cells - an important prerequisite for advancing the diagnosis and treatment of diseases such as cancer.

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Leibniz-Institut für Lebensmittel-Systembiologie an der Technischen Universität München positiv evaluiert

Freising, 14. Juli 2022

Die Förderung des Leibniz-Instituts für Lebensmittel-Systembiologie an der Technischen Universität München (LSB) durch Bund und Länder soll fortgeführt werden. Dies hat der Senat der Leibniz-Gemeinschaft nach Abschluss der regelmäßigen wissenschaftlichen Evaluierung beschlossen. Eine erneute Überprüfung der Fördervoraussetzungen soll im Jahr 2026 erfolgen.

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Why stored linseed oil tastes bitter − And what you could do about it

Freising, April 21, 2022

A team of scientists led by the Leibniz Institute for Food Systems Biology at the Technical University of Munich, in cooperation with the Chair of Food Chemistry and Molecular Sensory Science at the Technical University of Munich, has now uncovered new molecular details relevant to the bitterness of stored linseed oil. The new findings should help to develop suitable technological processes or breeding strategies that preserve the good taste of the edible oil for longer.

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2021

The role of bitter receptors in cancer

Receptors as targets for chemotherapeutics

Freising / Vienna, December 03, 2021

Bitter taste receptors do not only support humans in tasting. They are also found on cancer cells. A team led by Veronika Somoza from the Faculty of Chemistry at the University of Vienna and the German Leibniz Institute for Food Systems Biology at the Technical University of Munich has investigated the role they play there. For this purpose, the scientists compiled and evaluated extensive scientific data. Their results suggest that bitter taste receptors should also be considered as additional targets for chemotherapeutic agents in the future and should be investigated in this regard. The systematic review recently appeared in the journal Cancers.

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Leibniz Association funds olfactory and taste research with almost two million euros

Freising, November 25, 2021

The senses of smell and taste are crucial for the perception of food and thus for food selection, which in turn significantly influences our health. But how do odorants and flavors interact with our sense receptors to make food taste good? And what kind of molecular mechanisms ensure a good mouthfeel? In order to strengthen young talents in this field of research, the Leibniz Association is funding two female scientists from the Leibniz Institute for Food Systems Biology at the Technical University of Munich (LSB) for the next five years with a total of almost two million euros as part of the Leibniz Competition 2022.

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Spicy substance from pepper gets into breast milk after eating

Spicy breast milk?

Freising, November 25, 2021

In part of a recent human study led by the Technical University of Munich (TUM), it was found that after eating a curry dish containing pepper, piperine - an alkaloid responsible for the pungency of pepper - was present in the milk of breastfeeding women.  The findings help decipher mechanisms that shape our food preferences from infancy.

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Michael Paul is the new head of administration at the Leibniz Institute for Food Systems Biology

Freising, November 02, 2021

The Leibniz Institute for Food Systems Biology at the Technical University of Munich (LSB) has strengthened its top management with Michael Paul. The state-certified business economist with a focus on business informatics and organization will take over the position of the head of administration on November 01, 2021. In the future, Prof. Dr. Veronika Somoza as Director of the LSB and Michael Paul will form the Leibniz Institute's Steering Board.

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Gastric cells—Plant substance from wine influences acid secretion via a bitter receptor

Freising, October 27, 2021

Gallic acid is a secondary plant ingredient found in wine or green tea. An Austrian-German team of scientists led by Veronika Somoza, has now found evidence that gallic acid influences gastric acid release by activating a bitter receptor. The study results provide new insights into the still unknown functions of bitter receptors in interaction with taste-active food ingredients.

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"Caramel receptor" identified—New insights from the world of chemical senses

Freising, October 12, 2021

Who doesn't like the smell of caramel? However, the olfactory receptor that contributes decisively to this sensory impression was unknown until now. Researchers at the Leibniz Institute for Food Systems Biology at the Technical University of Munich (LSB) have now solved the mystery of its existence and identified the "caramel receptor". The new knowledge contributes to a better understanding of the molecular coding of food flavors.

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News on fine cocoa flavor

Quickly and precisely determining the flavor profile of cocoa samples

Freising, September 17, 2021

Because a plethora of flavor compounds contribute to the distinctive taste of cocoa, its composition is difficult to analyze. Now, scientists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the Leibniz Institute of Food Systems Biology (LSB) have developed a new methodology that quickly, easily, and precisely quantifies the flavor profile of cocoa samples.

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Progress in the functional characterization of human olfactory receptors

Freising, June 22, 2021

A team of scientists from the Leibniz Institute for Food Systems Biology at the Technical University of Munich has now discovered that the odorant receptor OR5K1 is specialized to recognize pyrazines in both humans and domesticated animals. These are volatile substances that contribute to the typical odor of many vegetables or are formed when food is heated. In addition, pyrazines also play a role as signaling substances in intra- or interspecific communication. The new research results contribute to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the odor perception of food as well as olfactory communication.

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Reliably detecting cocoa off-flavors–Relevant not only for chocolate fans

Freising, April 20, 2021

Musty, moldy, smoky or horse dung-like smelling cocoa is not suitable for chocolate production. As part of a larger research project, a team of scientists led by Martin Steinhaus from the Leibniz Institute for Food Systems Biology at the Technical University of Munich has identified the odorants responsible for such off-flavors. The food industry can now use these results to objectively assess the sensory quality of fermented cocoa based on odorant concentrations. The research team published the data in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

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What brings olfactory receptors to the cell surface − "Zip codes" for odor sensors identified

Freising, March 17, 2021

A team of scientists led by Dietmar Krautwurst from the Leibniz Institute for Food Systems Biology at the Technical University of Munich has now identified address codes in odorant receptor proteins for the first time. Similar to zip codes, the codes ensure that the sensor proteins are targeted from inside the cell to the cell surface, where they begin their work as odorant detectors. The new findings could contribute to the development of novel test systems with which the odorant profiles of foods can be analyzed in a high-throughput process and thus could be better controlled.

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Now published: Research Report 'Advancing Science for Food & Health'

Biennial report of the Leibniz Institute for Food Systems Biology at the Technical University of Munich.

Freising, March 16, 2021
With this bilingual report (German/English) we not only provide exciting insights into our science and research, but also report on important events in 2018 and 2019.

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Bitter receptor involved in anti-inflammatory effect of resveratrol?

Freising, March 02, 2021

Resveratrol is a plant compound found primarily in red grapes and Japanese knotweed. Its synthetic variant has been approved as a food ingredient in the EU since 2016. At least in cell-based test systems, the substance has anti-inflammatory properties. A recent collaborative study by the Leibniz Institute for Food Systems Biology at the Technical University of Munich and the Department of Physiological Chemistry of the Faculty of Chemistry at the University of Vienna has now shown that the bitter receptor TAS2R50 is involved in this effect. The team of scientists led by Veronika Somoza published its results in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

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From Coelacanths to Humans−What Evolution Reveals about the Function of Bitter Receptors

Freising, February 02, 2021

To evaluate the chemical composition of food from a physiological point of view, it is important to know the functions of the receptors that interact with food ingredients. These include receptors for bitter compounds, which first evolved during evolution in bony fishes such as the coelacanth. What 400 million years of evolutionary history reveal about the function of both fish and human bitter receptors was recently published in the journal Genome Biology and Evolution by a team of researchers led by the Leibniz Institute for Food Systems Biology at the Technical University of Munich and the University of Cologne.

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2020

Sweet taste reduces appetite?

Freising, November 10, 2020

To date, very little is known about how sweetness perception contributes to satiety. This study, conducted by an Austrian-German team led by chemists Veronika Somoza and Barbara Lieder, provides new insights into the relationship between the sweet taste of sugar, energy intake and the regulatory process of hunger and satiety. The study was published in the journal „Nutrients“.

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Prof. Dr. Veronika Somoza has been awarded the AGFD Fellow Award 2020

Freising, September 7, 2020

The Agricultural and Food Chemistry Division (AGFD) of the American Chemical Society (ACS) has awarded Prof. Dr. Veronika Somoza with the AGFD Fellow Award, Agricultural and Food Chemistry 2020. The prize, which has been awarded to ACS members since 1988, honors outstanding scientific contributions in the field of agricultural and food chemistry.

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Is modern wheat off the hook?

Gluten in wheat: What has changed during 120 years of breeding?

Freising, August 11, 2020

In recent years, the number of people affected by coeliac disease, wheat allergy or gluten or wheat sensitivity has risen sharply. But why is this the case? Could it be that modern wheat varieties contain more immunoreactive protein than in the past? Results from a study by the Leibniz-Institute for Food Systems Biology at the Technical University of Munich and the Leibniz Institute of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research are helping to answer this question.

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Chanterelle mushrooms as a taste enhancer

New method for quality control of chanterelle mushrooms  

Freising, June 30, 2020

Chanterelles give savoury dishes a rich body and a unique complex flavour. Experts refer to this as the kokumi effect. A research team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the Leibniz-Institute for Food Systems Biology recently developed the first method to clearly quantify chanterelle-specific key substances that contribute to this effect. This method can also be used for quality control.

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Latest findings on bitter substances in coffee

Why caffeine is not the sole contributor to bitterness

Freising, June 17, 2020

Coffee is very popular around the world despite or perhaps because of its bitter taste. Compounds contained in the coffee such as caffeine contribute to the bitterness to varying degrees. A recent study conducted by the Leibniz-Institute for Food Systems Biology and the Technical University of Munich (TUM) provides new insights into the molecular interactions between bitter substances and bitter receptors. This is of relevance not only for taste perception.

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Flavor research for consumer protection

Flavorings containing benzaldehyde can develop benzene under the influence of light

Freising, March 26, 2020

In 2013, the Stiftung Warentest found harmful benzene in drinks with cherry flavor. But how did the substance get into the drinks? Was the source benzaldehyde, an essential component of the cherry flavoring? And if so, how could the problem be solved? A new study by the Leibniz-Institute for Food Systems Biology and the Technical University of Munich (TUM) is now able to answer these questions.

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First evidence of rare amino acid in plants–Discovering what makes durian stink

Freising, February 28, 2020

Researchers at the Leibniz-Institute for Food Systems Biology at the Technical University of Munich (Leibniz-LSB@TUM) have confirmed the presence of the rare amino acid ethionine in a plant – or more precisely, in the fruit of the durian tree. Despite its pungent odor, durian is very popular in Southeast Asia. As the team of scientists has shown, the amino acid plays a key role in the formation of the characteristic durian odor. 

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2019

Der Funktion von Geruchsrezeptoren auf der Spur ‒ oder warum Kupfer Zwiebelgeruch verstärken kann

Freising, 31.10.2019

Der Mensch besitzt hunderte von Geruchsrezeptortypen. Doch wie arbeiten diese Rezeptoren auf molekularer Ebene? Bislang ist nur wenig hierüber bekannt. Unter Führung des Leibniz-Instituts für Lebensmittel-Systembiologie an der TU München hat nun ein deutsch-amerikanisches Wissenschaftlerteam erstmals gezeigt, dass der Geruchsrezeptor OR2M3 in Gegenwart von Kupferionen bis zu vierfach stärker auf einen schwefelhaltigen Geruchsstoff aus Zwiebeln reagiert. Ausschlaggebend hierfür könnten zwei neuentdeckte Kupferbindungsstellen im Inneren des Rezeptors sein.

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2019

Leibniz-Institute for Food Systems Biology at the Technical University of Munich has a new director

Veronika Somoza succeeds Thomas F. Hofmann

Freising, October 24, 2019

Prof. Dr. Veronika Somoza will take on her new post as Director of the Leibniz-Institute for Food Systems Biology at the Technical University of Munich (Leibniz-LSB@TUM) as of November 1, 2019. She succeeds Prof. Thomas F. Hofmann, who is leaving the Leibniz-Institute, located in Freising, for his new position as President of the Technical University of Munich (TUM). The position as Director also entails the Professorship for Nutritional Systems Biology at the TUM School of Life Sciences Weihenstephan's Department of Nutrition and Food Sciences.

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Better food quality control‒

Food profilers develop new methodological approach for food analysis

Freising, July 30, 2019

Scientists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the Leibniz-Institute for Food Systems Biology have developed a new methodology for the simultaneous analysis of odorants and tastants. It could simplify and accelerate the quality control of food in the future.

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Forschungspreis 2019 der Deutschen Zöliakie-Gesellschaft geht an Katharina Scherf 

Freising, 10.07.2019

PD Dr. Katharina Scherf ist Lebensmittelchemikerin am Leibniz-Institut für Lebensmittel-Systembiologie an der TU München. Sie erhält den diesjährigen Forschungspreis der Deutschen Zöliakie-Gesellschaft (DZG e.V.) für ein wissenschaftliches Projekt, das die Verlässlichkeit eines tragbaren Gluten-Sensors für den Hausgebrauch überprüft. Der Preis ist mit einer Forschungsförderung in Höhe von 20.000 Euro verbunden.

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Pharmaconutrition‒Modern drug design for functional studies

Freising, July 1, 2019

Antonella Di Pizio and Maik Behrens of the Leibniz-Institute for Food Systems Biology at the Technical University of Munich, together with their cooperation partners, have developed highly effective activators for the bitter receptor TAS2R14 in a German-Israeli research project. The new substances are used to investigate the as yet unknown physiological functions of the receptor, for example, in the human immune system.

The team of scientists published their results in the journal Cellular and Molecular Life Sciences (Di Pizio et al., 2019; DOI: 10.1007/s00018-019-03194-2).

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New findings on the effect of Epsom salt‒Epsom salt receptor identified

Freising, April 8, 2019

A team of scientists headed by Maik Behrens from the Leibniz-Institute for Food Systems Biology at the Technical University of Munich has identified the receptor responsible for the bitter taste of various salts. These include medically used Epsom salt. The discovery helps to elucidate the physiological mechanisms by which Epsom salt affects the heart or gut.

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How rapeseed could be used as a protein source for human nutrition

Bitter rapeseed

Freising, January 31, 2019

Rapeseed doesn't just contain oil but high-quality protein, too. However, protein extracts from rapeseed have an intense, bitter off-taste. A team led by food chemist Thomas Hofmann has now identified the substance that is pivotal for the bitter taste. This is a first step towards developing rapeseed for the human protein supply.

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Store craft beer in a cool place and consume it as fresh as possible

Freising, January 14, 2019

A new study by the Leibniz-Institute for Food Systems Biology at the Technical University of Munich (Leibniz-LSB@TUM) shows that craft beer should be kept cool and consumed as fresh as possible. After three months, cold stored beer already loses more than one third of an important hop odorant which characterizes the typical aroma of many craft beers. Storage at room temperature causes the concentration of this substance to decrease even more significantly.

Martin Steinhaus and Klaas Reglitz from the Leibniz LSB@TUM recently published their findings in the journal BrewingScience, doi.org/10.23763/BRSC18-13STEINHAUS.

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2018

Warum Einkorn besser für Menschen mit Weizenunverträglichkeit sein könnte

Freising 14.11.2018

Moderne, aber auch ursprüngliche Weizenarten wie Einkorn, Emmer und Dinkel enthalten natürlicherweise eine Gruppe von Eiweißmolekülen, die im Verdacht steht, Symptome einer Weizenunverträglichkeit auszulösen. Eine neue Studie des Leibniz-Instituts für Lebensmittel-Systembiologie an der TU München zeigt erstmals im direkten Vergleich, dass Einkorn im Gegensatz zu Brotweizen, Hartweizen, Dinkel und Emmer keine oder deutlich geringere Mengen dieser Eiweiße enthält. Die Forschenden veröffentlichten ihre Ergebnisse nun in der Fachzeitschrift Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

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2018

Making cheese & co. taste better – The hunt for flavor-giving fragments

Freising, November 6, 2018

Researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM), the Leibniz-Institute for Food Systems Biology, and the University of Hohenheim have developed a new methodical approach. It allows for the faster identification of flavor-giving protein fragments in foods such as cheese or yogurt, thus optimizing production processes.

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Thomas Hofmann elected as TUM’s new President

Freising October 17, 2018

The Board of Trustees of the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has elected Prof. Thomas Hofmann (50) as the new President of TUM. The experienced university manager has held the position of Senior Vice President Research and Innovation at TUM since 2009. He made a significant contribution to TUM’s success in the Excellence Initiative, especially in developing the internationally acclaimed “TUM Faculty Tenure Track” recruitment and career system. Under his guidance, TUM also became Germany’s top university for the establishment of start-ups. The holder of the Chair of Food Chemistry and Molecular Sensory Science has received multiple awards for his research and teaching. On October 1, 2019, Hofmann will take over from Prof. Wolfgang A. Herrmann, whose far-reaching reforms in his 23-year tenure saw TUM rise to international top level.

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Mehl-Schnelltest weiterentwickelt - Backqualität von Dinkel-, Emmer- und Einkorn-Vollkornmehl nun schneller vorhersagbar

Freising 03.09.2018

Die Ergebnisse einer Vergleichsstudie des Leibniz-Instituts für Lebensmittel-Systembiologie an der TU München (Leibniz-LSB@TUM) erlauben es erstmals, die Backqualität von Dinkel-, Emmer- und Einkorn-Vollkornmehl schnell und verlässlich vorherzusagen. Die neuen Resultate könnten zukünftig dazu beitragen, zeitraubende und aufwendige Voruntersuchungen im Labor zu ersetzen. Die Wissenschaftler und Wissenschaftlerinnen veröffentlichten ihre Ergebnisse jetzt im Journal of Cereal Science.

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Pungent tasting substance in ginger reduces bad breath – How food ingredients affect our taste perception

Freising July 30, 2018

The pungent compound 6-gingerol, a constituent of ginger, stimulates an enzyme contained in saliva ¬– an enzyme which breaks down foul-smelling substances.  It thus ensures fresh breath and a better aftertaste. Citric acid, on the other hand, increases the sodium ion content of saliva, making salty foods taste less salty. To find out more about food components, a team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the Leibniz- Institute for Food Systems Biology investigated the effects of food components on the molecules dissolved in saliva.

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Bitterrezeptor liefert Basis für die Entwicklung neuartiger Arzneimittel-Tests

Freising, 20.07.2018

Wussten Sie schon, dass sich Bitterrezeptoren nicht nur auf der Zunge befinden, sondern u. a. auch auf Herzzellen und Zellen der Atemwege? Und ist Ihnen bekannt, dass neben Geschmacksstoffen auch zahlreiche Arzneistoffe unsere Bittersensoren aktivieren? Eine neue internationale Studie unter Führung von Maik Behrens vom Leibniz-Institut für Lebensmittel-Systembiologie an der TU München gibt nun einen detaillierten Einblick in die Zusammenhänge zwischen der Molekülstruktur und Funktion des Bitterrezeptors TAS2R14. Ihre Ergebnisse könnten künftig dazu beitragen, neuartige, biologische Testsysteme für Arzneimittel zu entwickeln (Nowak et al. 2018, Biochimica et Biophysica Acta - General Subjects)

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Flavoring substances stimulate immune defenses – More than just a good flavor

Freising June 18, 2018

Not only do citric acid and spicy 6-gingerol from ginger add special flavors to food and beverages; both substances also stimulate the molecular defenses in human saliva. That is the result of a human clinical trial by a team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the Leibniz-Institute for Food Systems Biology.

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Leibniz-Institute at Technical University of Munich celebrates 100th anniversary – Research for healthy and delicious nutrition

Freising June 15, 2018

It all began humbly in 1918 with the immediate goal of practically investigating how to improve nutrition in times of war-related food shortages. Today it is a major player in research on food and nutrition. The State of Bavaria has paved the way for this journey to the future: The Leibniz-Institute for Food Systems Biology at the Technical University of Munich is celebrating its 100th anniversary with a festive scientific symposium including high-ranking representatives from science, politics and the community.

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Presseeinladung – Leibniz-Institut für Lebensmittel-Systembiologie an der TUM feiert 100. Geburtstag

05.06.2018

Freising - Das Leibniz-Institut für Lebensmittel-Systembiologie an der Technischen Universität München (Leibniz-LSB@TUM) feiert einen ganz besonderen Geburtstag! Was 1918 klein begann, um mit praktischen Untersuchungen die Ernährung in Zeiten kriegsbedingter Lebensmittelnöte zu verbessern, spielt 100 Jahre später in der wissenschaftlichen Spitzenliga: Das Institut steht für Neubeginn, Mut und Kraft, immer vorauszudenken und vorauszugehen – unsere Absolventinnen und Absolventen sind in aller Welt gefragt!

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